Optimising images the easy way

One of the largest assets on any website these days are the images, especially with the current trend for big hero images and image sliders on front pages. This means that they are a prime target for attention when working on a development process. There are many things that you can do to compress images, and…

Optimising javascript files

In this next great installment of my new development process I want to head back to looking at javascript files, as my last three posts have been about adding stylesheets in my process, lazy loading stylesheets that are non-critical and using resource hints (although technically that last one applies to any resources, not just stylesheets). The last time I wrote about javascript…

Adding stylesheets into my Gulp file

I have been working on a series of blog post about my new development process, which so far has focused exclusively on javascript, including concatenation of javascript files, using Browserify to load jQuery and other javascript library files, and minifying (or uglifying) javascript files. Next it’s time to look at adding stylesheets. Similar to javascript…

Minifying (or uglifying) javascript

Totally in keeping with my New Year’s Resolution, here is a lovely new blog post!  And it’s a continuation of my new development process.  The last post in the series detailed my switch to using pump instead of pipe in my Gulp task. Today’s post is about minifying javascript, which is sometimes called “uglifying”.  The reason being that this…

Using pump instead of pipe

One thing that I quickly discovered whilst using Gulp to automate my development process, was the piping the results through from one plugin to another could often go wrong, and it was often hard to trap the reason and get proper error messaging out. Then I discovered some example code which pointed me to pump:…

Adding Browserify into the mix

Having already written my first gulp task, I was ready to get a bit more advanced. My first task was to concatenate javascript files, including putting my local version of jQuery in front of my own javascript, so there was a single file to download, with all the required plugins before. However, I’d already heard…